Computer Vision and Machine Learning

Here you can find an overview of current research projects within this team. More details and related publications can be found on the respective project pages. Contact information for the team leader can be found down below.

Current Research Areas
Understanding Deep Learning

Understanding Deep Learning

Deep neural networks are tremendously successful in many applications, but end-to-end trained networks often result in hard to understand black-box classifiers or predictors. In this Project, we face this problem. We develop methods, to determine whether a feature is relevant to the decision of a deep neural network. Further, we develop methods to influence which features will be considered by a neural network during training. This can help to learn more robust, trustworthy and fair deep neural networks.

Time frame: 2017 – 2021
Understanding Deep Learning

Fine-grained Recognition

In this research area, we are developing methods that are able to automatically distinguish between very similar object categories. The algorithms learn from given pictures and their annotations the locations as well as the characteristics of relevant features. Applications for this research include automatic biodiversity monitoring.

Time frame: 2014 – 2022
Active Learning

Active Learning

Although labeled data lies at the very core of most computer vision systems, obtaining labeled data that is useful and reliable is commonly a crucial problem. To reduce the amount of manual labeling, active learning techniques aim at explicitely picking samples that are actually worth being labeled with respect to the problem on hand. In this area of research, we are interested in modeling the “worthyness” of an unlabeled sample and to apply our algorithms to human-in-the-loop recognition systems.

Time frame: 2012 – 2022
Novelty Detection

Novelty Detection

In many important learning tasks, training examples are often available for only one class. Learning in this scenario is difficult, since training examples from “outside” are not available at all. This problem is known as one-class classification (OCC), novelty detection, and outlier detection, to name just a few. Our work in this area addresses the use of methods for deriving a set of suitable OCC scores and to apply OCC in an incremental learning framework.

Time frame: 2012 – 2022
Contact
Paul BodesheimPaul Bodesheim
Dr.-Ing.
Team Leader

paul.bodesheim@uni-jena.de

Room: 1218
Phone: (+49) 3641 9 46410